« July 2014 »
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

 

Berkshire Community Garden
 
Berkshire has had a community vegetable garden since 2008.  Produce is donated to local soup kitchens and food banks. 
Here are some recipients: 
     Forgotten Harvest
     Gleaners
     South Oakland Shelter
     Yad Ezra
     Cass
     St. Leo's Soup Kitchen
     Lighthouse
     Baldwin Center
     Par Garden in Oak Park. 


 
 



Many thanks to:
Goldner Walsh Nursery
ACE Hardware (13 Mile and Southfield Rd.)
Franklin Garden Club
Main's Nursery
Birmingham Education Foundation
Berkshire PTA
BPS Grounds Crew
Mr. Ed's Tree Care
for their continued, generous support! 

Four Eagle Scout Projects

To date, four Eagle Scout Projects have benefitted the garden: the fence, raised beds, drip irrigation system with a timer, and a garden shed.  
Thank-you Eagle Scouts!!


 

Many thanks to all the awesome gardeners who volunteer from Spring to Fall!  This year we grew a variety of heirloom tomatoes, eggplant, radishes, lettuce, mustard greens, a variety of peppers, green beans, cucumbers, peas, carrots, zucchini, squash, cauliflower and broccoli. 
Image
                                                                                                               
Volunteers Needed for the 2014 -15 season!
No experience necessary!    

To volunteer please call 248-203-4706 or email: ll02bps@birmingham.k12.mi.us   


  School Gardens Cause a Ripple Effect!
Incorporating gardening into the educational process empowers children to lead healthy, well-balanced lives.  When these classroom concepts become part of everyday conversations, enthusiasm spreads, engagement and cooperation grow among family and friends, and communities are transformed into safer, more nurturing environments.
Hands On Academics-- School gardens provide a hand-on learning laboratory where children can apply and explore classroom concepts.  From the science of plant biology and natural cycles to the application of math skills to measure, divide and calculate the harvest, students become active and engaged learners.

Diet and Exercise- School garden programs improve a child's understanding of good nutrition and increase consumption of fruits and vegetables while providing an opportunity for regular, moderate exercise in an enjoyable way.  These healthy diet and exercise practices, planted like seeds in a school garden, often grow into lifelong healthy habits.

Wellness and Self-Esteem- Success in the garden gives students an opportunity to feel good about themselves and their accomplishments.  When a child is able to share something they have helped to grow, they retain a sense of ownership and pride; and when children and community members work together they build relationships that last long after the harvest.

Environment and Community-  Children who participate in gardening programs often develop an enhanced appreciation and respect for the world around them.  By working together to build and care for a garden, children and volunteers experience the positive impact that they can bring to their communities reinforcing their desire to particpate in more good works.
               
Source:  National Gardening Association
   Kidsgardening.org 





                    
           
Site Map | Privacy Policy | View "printer-friendly" page | Login   In Japanese  In Korean  En français  Auf Deutsch  In italiano   No português  En español  In Russian  
Site powered by SchoolFusion.com © 2014 - Educational website content management